Patchwork Poetics

poet. quilter. a little off-kilter.

weian-fu:

theanti90smovement:

people get angrier about their tax money going towards helping people than it going towards killing people 

THIS THIS THIS THIS THIIIIIIIIS

(via autisticdean)

afrofuturistaffair:

afrofuturistaffair:

afrofuturistaffair:

Recurrence Plot #TimeTravel Tour with author/creator of The AfroFuturist Affair Rasheedah Phillips | discussions, readings, tabling at various space-times with other visionaries:
July 12 - Afro Futurism, Sci-Fi and Cultural Myths: A Dialogue Among Visionary Writers @ Harlem Book Fair Urban Arts & Literary Festival
In this dialogue, writers of Afro-Futurism will explore the possibilities and cultural gems within our own “afro-mythology” juxtaposed to a sci-fi landscape and its ensuing cultural implication. Featuring Dja Dja N MedJay (Renpet, N Eternity Reclaimed); Rasheedah Phillips (Recurrence Plot); Cerece Rennie Murphy, (Order of the Seers)
July 26 - Visionary Literature: Two New Indie Books Claim Space  w/ Dismantle Anthology @Bluestockings Bookstore
Presenting Recurrence Plot alongside Thread Makes Blanket Press and writers and editors from Dismantle VONA Anthology for a reading and panel discussion exploring how two small, independent presses in Philadelphia are exploring issues of race, gender, literature, and a better future.
August 2 - RIPEXPO w/ Metropolarity 
The Rhode Island Independent Publishing Expo (RIPExpo) is a summer weekend devoted to small-press and self-published comics, zines and books. 
August 5 - IMPRINT: Independent Publishing Panel
Leeway Foundation presents IMPRINT, a skill share and panel discussion featuring Lillian Dunn of Apiary Magazine, Lovella Calica of Warrior Writers, Marissa Johnson-Valenzuela of Thread Makes Blanket Press and Dismantle Anthology, Rasheedah Phillips of The AfroFuturist Affair and Metropolarity and Dr. Yaba Blay of BLACKprint Press.
August 9 - Reading at Penn Bookstore feat. Alex Smith of Metropolarity/Laser Life/ARKDUST
For more info, visit our events page at www.afrofuturistaffair.com

TOMORROW catch us at the Harlem Book Fair!

The tour continues TONIGHT at 7pm! Visionary Literature with The AfroFuturist Affair presenting Recurrence Plot: And Other Time Travel Tales + Thread Makes Blanket Press presenting #Dismantle VONA Anthology at Bluestockings Bookstore, Café, & Activist Center

afrofuturistaffair:

afrofuturistaffair:

afrofuturistaffair:

Recurrence Plot #TimeTravel Tour with author/creator of The AfroFuturist Affair Rasheedah Phillips | discussions, readings, tabling at various space-times with other visionaries:

July 12 - Afro Futurism, Sci-Fi and Cultural Myths: A Dialogue Among Visionary Writers @ Harlem Book Fair Urban Arts & Literary Festival

In this dialogue, writers of Afro-Futurism will explore the possibilities and cultural gems within our own “afro-mythology” juxtaposed to a sci-fi landscape and its ensuing cultural implication. Featuring Dja Dja N MedJay (Renpet, N Eternity Reclaimed); Rasheedah Phillips (Recurrence Plot); Cerece Rennie Murphy, (Order of the Seers)

July 26 - Visionary Literature: Two New Indie Books Claim Space  w/ Dismantle Anthology @Bluestockings Bookstore

Presenting Recurrence Plot alongside Thread Makes Blanket Press and writers and editors from Dismantle VONA Anthology for a reading and panel discussion exploring how two small, independent presses in Philadelphia are exploring issues of race, gender, literature, and a better future.

August 2 - RIPEXPO w/ Metropolarity 

The Rhode Island Independent Publishing Expo (RIPExpo) is a summer weekend devoted to small-press and self-published comics, zines and books. 

August 5 - IMPRINT: Independent Publishing Panel

Leeway Foundation presents IMPRINT, a skill share and panel discussion featuring Lillian Dunn of Apiary Magazine, Lovella Calica of Warrior Writers, Marissa Johnson-Valenzuela of Thread Makes Blanket Press and Dismantle Anthology, Rasheedah Phillips of The AfroFuturist Affair and Metropolarity and Dr. Yaba Blay of BLACKprint Press.

August 9 - Reading at Penn Bookstore feat. Alex Smith of Metropolarity/Laser Life/ARKDUST

For more info, visit our events page at www.afrofuturistaffair.com

TOMORROW catch us at the Harlem Book Fair!

The tour continues TONIGHT at 7pm! Visionary Literature with The AfroFuturist Affair presenting Recurrence Plot: And Other Time Travel Tales + Thread Makes Blanket Press presenting #Dismantle VONA Anthology at Bluestockings Bookstore, Café, & Activist Center

(via metropolarity)

Second Wave of Panels Announced!

metropolarity:

cyborgmemoirs:

heyanniemok:

ripexpo:

Magickal / Realism: Sci-fi, Magic, Mystery, and Permeable Binaries
This panel centers around exploring ideas of personal points of view and ways of describing spaces, memory, time, sex, gender, race, and trauma, with work that is considered fantastical, sci-fi/speculative, or magical realist. How is artmaking magickal? How are these artists making spaces in their work that challenges, diverges from, and/or ignores what colonialist, white supremacist ideas of what objective reality or capital-L Literature are?

With Alabaster, Alex Smith, Inés Estrada, Maggie Eighteen, O Horvath, Rasheedah Phillips, moderated by Annie Mok

More Fit Than Print: Webcomics
For decades comic strips were a driving and competitive force for driving newspaper sales. Now in the 21st century, both traditional comic strips and newspapers are decaying and web news and entertainment has become a dominant force. What is the inspiration, evolution and experience like publishing online and how does one’s accessibility to their audience effect their work? What are the challenges of creating/maintaining a public persona? Are there different challenges when your readership is global? What’s the next phase of evolution for webcomics and how will that affect one’s work?

With KC Green, Kevin Czapiewski, Sara Goetter, Tony Breed, moderated by Stefen Blitz

See the rest of our Programming: http://ripexpo.tumblr.com/programming

Also check out our freshly announced Evening Events!: http://ripexpo.tumblr.com/eveningevents

So jazzed for our Magickal / Realism panel! The topic is dear to my heart and is born partially out of conversations I had with Eighteen about these ideas, and also some talk along the same lines at our panel with Alex & Rasheedah at our Vox Populi Gallery event for Screentests. <3

I have only ever been on panels before talking about Dragonball Z, and cyborgs/androids/robots/jinzouningen in anime b4……….. next weekend. 

Metropolarity is stoked like a fire, but our ride up to Providence form Philly fell through and we’re looking for any kind of way up there, either from Friday night or Saturday VERY EARLY in the morning. Msg us if you have any info? ;-;

The Rolling Stones ft. Merry Clayton - Gimme Shelter (Isolated Vocals)

theuppitynegras:

so-treu:

maybeitsmaccaline:

Gimme Shelter

Let it Bleed, 1969

This is an excerpt of the song “Gimme Shelter.” The backing vocalist, Merry Clayton, had a small solo in the middle of the song, and since I believe she never got much credit for her vocals, I uploaded the isolated vocal track of her part. I always wondered who she was and I found out recently.She is a very experienced backup singer and has also done backup vocals (live and studio) for artists such as Ringo Starr, Ray Charles, Joe Cocker, Neil Young, and moreThis solo may just make the song for me. Her voice is so raw and powerful. Each time I listen to it, I get chills. The effect is much stronger when her voice is isolated.

THIS IS AMAZING THIS IS AMAZING THIS IS AMAZING

THIS IS SO AMAZING I DON’T HAVE TIME TO ADDRESS OP’S RIDICULOUSLY SUPERFICIAL DESCRIPTION OF MERRY CLAYTON OR HOW SHE FUCKING MADE THIS SONG I’M TOO BUSY CRYING AT THE RAW POWER OF HER VOICE

TRUE STORY SHE RECORDED THIS AFTER GETTING A PHONE CALL AFTER MIDNIGHT FROM THE PRODUCERS. SHE LAID THIS TRACK DOWN AFTER BEING ASLEEP, WHILE WEARING ROLLERS IN HER HAIR AND A ROBE

OH YEAH AND SHE WAS PREGNANT AS FUCK.

SHE ALSO MISCARRIED AFTER THIS SESSION, SUPPOSEDLY FROM THE PHYSICAL/EMOTIONAL STRAIN FROM THIS SESSION

(SOURCE FOR ALL OF THIS)

SO THIS VOCAL TRACK IS REALLY FUCKING IMPORTANT AND REALLY KINDA FUCKING SACRED. EVERYONE CAN GLORIFY SOME WHITE ROCKER FOR STEALING BLACK MUSIC AND BEING DRUNK AND HIGH AS FUCK WHILE DOING SO BUT THE BLACK WOMEN LIKE CLAYTON WHO WERE THE BACKBONE AND SHAPERS
OF ROCK AND ROLL AND FUCKING WENT THROUGH SOME REAL ASS SHIT FOR IT ARE IGNORED

AND IF YOU WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT MERRY CLAYTON WATCH 20 FEET FROM STARDOM IT’S ON NETFLIX

she also recorded her own version of this song and it’s pretty

(via so-treu)

A cop may have put a pregnant woman in a chokehold during a struggle in Brooklyn

atane:

So the NYPD is at it again. This time they have choked a 7 month pregnant Black woman. Her offense? She was grilling in front of her house. This is over a damn grill.

Right on cue, people are already talking about the NYPD needing sensitivity training etc. They don’t get it. This is what the NYPD does. It’s not about a lack of training. They are looking for any reason to inflict fear and escalate a situation so they can use as much force as possible. I don’t know how many more incidents need to happen to make it click in their heads that the police is terrorizing Black communities. How much more ridiculous do these situations need to get? You tell me what warrants choking a pregnant woman for grilling in front of her house. Damn whether that is not allowed or not. You know what you do in that situation as a cop? You give her a citation or a fine. Not the NYPD, they choke and assault pregnant Black women.

(via ethiopienne)

In Labor, In Chains: The Outrageous Shackling of Pregnant Inmates

EARLY one morning in November 2011, Tina Tinen, a pregnant prisoner at the Bedford Hills Correctional Facility in Westchester County, N.Y., woke with painful contractions. Guards called an ambulance to take her to the hospital and, according to her account, shackled her wrist to the bar of a gurney — despite a 2009 state law against shackling pregnant inmates during and after labor.

Ms. Tinen, who was serving time for a nonviolent drug offense, had been placed in restraints frequently throughout her pregnancy. A few weeks earlier, wearing handcuffs and ankle irons, she had slipped and fallen on icy pavement. Although she was now suffering considerable labor pain, guards refused to unshackle her until she reached the hospital bed, 15 minutes before she gave birth.

Not long after that, in July 2012, another Bedford Hills prisoner, Jacqueline McDougall, was shackled on the return trip to the prison after giving birth in Westchester Medical Center. Although Ms. McDougall had undergone an emergency cesarean section and had needed a blood transfusion, her handcuffs were linked to a chain around her waist and clamped together over her sutured incision, she recalled. “With the weight on the stomach,” she said, “it felt like they were ripping open my C-section.”

Ms. Tinen and Ms. McDougall are not isolated cases. A report to be released in September by the Correctional Association of New York, a nonprofit group that monitors prison conditions, indicates that such shackling is common. Of 27 women whom the association surveyed who had given birth in New York prisons since the passage of the 2009 law, 23 reported having been shackled just before, during or after their delivery.

“The law was put in place because New York State recognized that these practices are an affront to human rights and decency,” said Tamar Kraft-Stolar, director of the association’s Women in Prison Project. “The fact that it’s being routinely violated is egregious.”

A spokesman for the Department of Corrections and Community Supervision in New York declined to comment on the report.

This is a multistate problem. Over the last 15 years, 21 states have enacted laws against shackling pregnant inmates during and after labor, but many of the laws have proved ineffectual. In interviews with former inmates, prison officials and medical providers — and in records acquired through freedom of information requests — I have found evidence of negligence in the implementation of these laws across the country.

Although it is estimated that only about 2,000 prisoners in American correctional facilities give birth each year, the issue raises a broader concern about excessively punitive aspects of prison culture. Democratic and Republican politicians alike have pushed for anti-shackling legislation. Doctors have called shackling a threat to the health of both mother and child. Criminologists have deemed it unnecessary, as it appears that no unshackled pregnant inmate has ever escaped during labor.

But in many correctional systems, doctors, guards and prison officials simply are not told about anti-shackling laws, or are not trained to comply. In Illinois, improperly trained guards continued to shackle women for years after such a law was passed in 1999. After some 80 prisoners in Cook County brought a class-action lawsuit, the state in 2012 passed legislation strengthening protections in the county. (The suit was settled for $4.1 million.) But downstate, an unpublished survey of county jails by Chicago Legal Advocacy for Incarcerated Mothers cites 20 institutions that don’t have written policies that fully comply with the statewide law. Corrections officials would not comment on these allegations but said that they expect each county facility to meet all existing standards.

Even California, an early adopter of anti-shackling legislation, has struggled to effectively implement its original 2005 law and an updated 2012 law. A report this year from Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, in San Francisco, found that a majority of California county correctional facilities had yet to implement proper written policies. Confronted with these findings, the Board of State and Community Corrections noted that there have been no incidents of shackling under the new law, that they are inspecting for compliance and that a review meeting to create standards for the jails is scheduled for later this year.

Inadequate implementation isn’t the only problem. The language of some of the laws gives wide latitude to corrections officers to use restraints if they identify security risks. In theory, this should improve safety, but in practice, it creates opportunities for the continuation of shackling.

In Pennsylvania, files provided by the state corrections department document just over 100 incidents in which women were shackled from July 2012 to June 2013, with security or risk of flight usually cited as the reason. But according to a recent report from the A.C.L.U. of Pennsylvania, hospital staff members report routinely seeing pregnant prisoners handcuffed in the hospital and during delivery.

Nationwide, perhaps the most prominent case is that of Valerie Nabors, who sued the state of Nevada after giving birth in its prison system three years ago. The state had previously outlawed restraints during labor and delivery. Ms. Nabors was serving a sentence at the Florence McClure Women’s Correctional Center in Las Vegas for stealing more than $250 in casino chips, and was not deemed a high flight risk.

According to the complaint, when Ms. Nabors went into labor, a prison nurse called an ambulance and Ms. Nabors was handcuffed and taken to the vehicle. Then officers shackled her ankles together. An ambulance supervisor protested, explaining that if Ms. Nabors’s water broke or complications developed, the supervisor would not have proper access to help her. Officers refused to remove the restraints.

At the hospital, a nurse also questioned the use of the shackles. The officers again refused to remove them. At the insistence of a delivery room nurse, they relented. Ms. Nabors gave birth to a daughter through an emergency cesarean section, but within 10 minutes she was placed back in ankle shackles and chained to the bed.

Doctors later found that Ms. Nabors had suffered several pulled muscles in her groin. X-rays revealed a separation of her pubic bones. Her physician concluded that the injuries were a direct result of the restraints. “We were shocked,” Staci Pratt of the A.C.L.U. of Nevada said of Ms. Nabors’s experience. “And it takes a lot to shock an A.C.L.U. attorney.”

Victims of illegal shackling rarely litigate, often because of feelings of shame or fear of repercussions. But Ms. Pratt helped Ms. Nabors bring a case against the Nevada Department of Corrections in 2012. This January, the state paid a settlement of $130,000.

Two months later, the Nevada Board of State Prison Commissioners adopted new regulations for oversight, including training requirements for corrections officers and investigatory obligations for the state.

Danyell Williams, a former doula for prisoners in Philadelphia, says that such lawsuits are crucial to ensuring proper compliance with anti-shackling laws. “These laws were passed,” she said, “and everybody patted themselves on the back for doing what was right and human and then went on about their business. But there’s no policing entity that’s really going to hold these institutions responsible.”

(Source: ethiopienne)

“I was talking with a friend, Ivette González-Alé, about fat identity and she asked, “fat according to whom?” She said her body is just like everyone else in her family; their indigeneity forms a body foreign to white standards of height/weight/body fat distribution. Fatness is set against white bodies, with no consideration for other groups, creating an identity irrelevant to her brown body.”

prettyofcenter:

standwithpalestine:

Israel wants as many Palestinians dead as possible. Ambulances carry the wounded to hospital to save lives. Ambulances must be taken out.

[tweet: a photo of what remains of an ambulance. it’s in many pieces. the text reads “This was an ambulance in Beit Hanoun until Israeli fire struck it, killing 5 people inside.”]

prettyofcenter:

standwithpalestine:

Israel wants as many Palestinians dead as possible. Ambulances carry the wounded to hospital to save lives. Ambulances must be taken out.

[tweet: a photo of what remains of an ambulance. it’s in many pieces. the text reads “This was an ambulance in Beit Hanoun until Israeli fire struck it, killing 5 people inside.”]

“You can’t change the laws without changing the images. It is one thing to say we exist; it is another thing to show it. Art is political, art is about activism.”

—   

Zanele Muholi

Quote is from a great piece in The New York Times: Lens, Photographing A ‘Difficult Love’ In South Africa by Alexis Okeowo. It is about Muholi’s critical work on portraying the nuance, love, relationship, lives…the humanity of Black lesbians in South Africa. She’s a stellar photographer, critical thinker, activist. 

(via driftsojourn)

Loved this quote; originally shared it on my photography blog.

(via gradientlair)

I love this

(via moyazb)

(via moyazb)

tw: violence against women, misogyny, misogynoir.

she-hulk-smash:

i would laugh at the fragility of the male ego

but then i remember that women are assaulted and killed for threatening it

(via zamimami)